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archiemcphee:

San Francisco-based artist Mona Caron beautifully painted this utility box at the intersection of Church St. and Duboce Ave. in San Francisco to make the drab grey box disappear into its urban surroundings and make those surroundings appear more utopian.

The Utility box envisions the mega-supermarket demolished and replaced with a local farmers’ market, but with its rear wall with the mural saved and propped up. This is a vision taken from Chris Carlsson’s utopian novel “After the Deluge” - so this painting pays homage to his homage.

That big mural seen both behind and on the utility box is the Duboce Bikeway Mural, also the work of Mona Caron.
Head over to Mona Caron’s website to check out more of the awesome ways she’s used her artwork to make San Francisco more beautiful.
[via io9]
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archiemcphee:

San Francisco-based artist Mona Caron beautifully painted this utility box at the intersection of Church St. and Duboce Ave. in San Francisco to make the drab grey box disappear into its urban surroundings and make those surroundings appear more utopian.

The Utility box envisions the mega-supermarket demolished and replaced with a local farmers’ market, but with its rear wall with the mural saved and propped up. This is a vision taken from Chris Carlsson’s utopian novel “After the Deluge” - so this painting pays homage to his homage.

That big mural seen both behind and on the utility box is the Duboce Bikeway Mural, also the work of Mona Caron.
Head over to Mona Caron’s website to check out more of the awesome ways she’s used her artwork to make San Francisco more beautiful.
[via io9]
Zoom Info

archiemcphee:

San Francisco-based artist Mona Caron beautifully painted this utility box at the intersection of Church St. and Duboce Ave. in San Francisco to make the drab grey box disappear into its urban surroundings and make those surroundings appear more utopian.

The Utility box envisions the mega-supermarket demolished and replaced with a local farmers’ market, but with its rear wall with the mural saved and propped up. This is a vision taken from Chris Carlsson’s utopian novel “After the Deluge” - so this painting pays homage to his homage.

That big mural seen both behind and on the utility box is the Duboce Bikeway Mural, also the work of Mona Caron.

Head over to Mona Caron’s website to check out more of the awesome ways she’s used her artwork to make San Francisco more beautiful.

[via io9]

archiemcphee:

Seattle-based artist Carol Milne knits with glass, or rather, she creates wonderful glass sculptures that make it seem as though she’s either a superhuman glass knitter or in possession of enchanted knitting needles and very specialized gloves. The reality is actually much more complicated, but no less awesome. Milne invented her glass knitting technique back in 2006. It’s a process that involves knitting with wax instead of glass, followed by lost-wax casting, mold-making and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

To check out more of Carol Milne’s extraordinary artwork visit the Glass Art SocietyMilne’s Facebook page or her online gallery.

[via Colossal]

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